Tuesday, July 23, 2024
Ignite the mind.


Tag: Death of children from air pollutants


Toxic Skies: Air Pollution, a Silent Killer in Africa, More Deadly than AIDS and Malaria Combined – Experts Warns

The Silent Crisis of Air Pollution and Infant Mortality is a cause for concern to us at LightRay! Media.

In the bustling city of Lagos, Nigeria, the air carries a hidden menace—one that silently claims lives and leaves a trail of devastation. According to a 2019 report by the Clean Air Fund, nearly 23,900 premature deaths in Lagos were directly linked to air pollution. Shockingly, this toll surpasses fatalities from malaria and HIV/AIDS combined.

But the impact extends beyond Lagos. At the national level, air pollution-related deaths reached a staggering 198,000, outpacing malaria fatalities (191,000) and more than doubling those caused by HIV/AIDS (82,000). These numbers paint a grim picture of a crisis that demands urgent attention.

Air pollution is the unseen threat to new lives

When pregnant mothers breathe in polluted air, harmful impurities infiltrate the placenta, affecting fetal organ development. By the time these babies enter the world, they bear the burden of poor air quality—a burden that can be fatal. Indeed, air pollution now ranks as the second largest risk factor for neonatal death.

But it’s not just neonates who suffer. Over 700,000 children worldwide succumb annually due to the insidious effects of air pollution. The heaviest burden falls on Africa and South Asia, where young lives hang in the balance.

As we grapple with this invisible menace, we must recognize that every breath matters. The air we breathe shapes our future, and safeguarding it is a collective responsibility. Let us raise our voices, advocate for cleaner air, and protect the most vulnerable among us—our children.

This is our editorial position. Our correspondent, Collins Odigie Ojiehanor and Publisher, Lady Ejiro Umukoro, provides more insight into this investigative report.

Picture of the a metal scrap worker burning insulated copper wires to collect copper in Ghana. Credit: Muntaka Chasant / Wikimedia Commons

By admin , in Ignite Inside stories , at July 11, 2024